[10.27.10]
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A Simple Job Search Tool: Is My Search Broken?

self-diagnosis, job search, finding a job, tool, freeI spend a lot of time with job seekers these days.  At networking events of course.  But also in individual meetings, Skype calls or conversations via various social media tools like LinkedIn, Twitter or Facebook.

And the most interesting conversation I get into starts with a question from me like:

Where do you think your job search is breaking down?

In my experience, some job seekers are struggling mightily or just getting started.  But most I meet with have been in the game for a few months.  And finding a job has become a chore.

They have quickly lost perspective.  Are doing the same things.  And if there is something broken, they are not seeing it.  They are lost.

Chris Brogan wrote about this yesterday on his blog: Don’t Get Lost.

Of course some of them say correctly that their job search isn’t inherently broken.  They are working hard and networking until the right fit comes along . . .

I’ve written about this idea before.  About signs that your job search is on the right track.  That post was about paying attention and measuring along the way.

Today’s post and job search tool is about completing your own situation analysis.  A one time look to see if there is a way to determine if something is truly broken.  And, if so, how to fix it.  So finding a job can soon be off your to do list.

So the self-diagnosis tool is not very complicated.  It is set up in almost chronological fashion based on the way your candidacy gets presented to your network, to intermediaries (recruiters, HR) and to the hiring manager.  There are 7 quick steps.

Here it is.  I call it InView™:

job search, finding a job, tool, self-diagnosis, career advice, broken

You can download it here: InView Job Search Tool until it is up on the free downloads page.

So how do you use this job search tool?  Well, I walk people through this informally and simply ask a lot of questions.  My goal, as should be yours, is to identify the one or two places where things are breaking down.  Where you haven’t been working with purpose.  Where you haven’t done a few key things to prepare yourself and your network.  And where you don’t feel confident.

It is my belief that everyone has a few places they could improve – if they only knew where to look . . .

But this job search tool is in its early stages and I would love your feedback.  In addition to the feedback I will get over the coming weeks.  As I walk people through the 7 steps.  If you’d like to be part of my research, send me a note.  We can do it via Skype or phone.  Or in person if you live in Southern California.  Or you can find a friend to interview you and put you to task!

If you identify a key area or two, be sure to check the Job Search, Career and Life FAQ for a few ideas on how to fix them.

One last point . . .

One of the most common questions I get after a meeting with a job seeker is the one that makes me smile.  It says that they “get” this career networking thing.  They ask:

“Tim, How Can I Help You?”

And I usually have a few ideas for them.  But the question has come up enough lately that I set up a page here on the site with a few additional ideas.  Will you click here and help me out?  How Can I help?

What do you think?

Photo Credit

Tim Tyrell-Smith is the creator of Tim’s Strategy. As a blogger, Tim has been a regular contributor to U.S. News and World Report, interviewed twice on NPR and is the author of two career books (“30 Ideas” and “HeadStrong”). Become a fan at http://facebook.com/TimsStrategy and follow on Twitter (@TimsStrategy). He lives with his wife and three kids in Mission Viejo, California.

Tim Tyrell-Smith – who has written posts on Tim's Strategy®.



Written by: Tim Tyrell-Smith
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